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Federal Point Families

The Weber-Waller Place
The Weber-Waller Home about 1913
wallerhome.jpg

The Weber - Waller Home about 1913

 

 

The Folsom Family sold a plot of land on the St. Johns River at Federal Point Fla. to

Dwight and David Wheeler, brothers from Fairfield County Conn. in 1903.  They each

built a home side by side on the property.  In 1913 one home was sold to Joseph and

Lydia Weber.  The other home was sold to William Van Wyck in 1916...

 

Joseph and Lydia Weber, with their youngest daughter Gladys had been coming to

Federal Point Fla. by boat from New York City and staying at the Groveland Hotel

for the winter months.  They liked it so much they bought the Wheeler home in 1913.

Gladys Weber married Wm. Manson Waller from Hastings in 1918.  In 1919 Joseph

Weber died and shortly after Gladys and Manson moved into the Weber house with

                     Lydia.  William (Billy) Waller Jr. was born there Dec. 8, 1925.

                 G. W. WALLER.

  From the dawn of history two types of men have

made the worlddominating and dominatedleader

and followeroriginator and imitator.  Plentiful are

the latterthe weak; a few of the strong exist.

Breaking through a stone wall, surmounting impas-

sable rocks, treading a new road alonethe leader

achieves the  impossible and climbs to  forbidding

heights of success, compelled by individual force and

 

thought, and dependent on no one but his own judg-

 ment, seeking no help or support. Casting precedent

 to the winds, he reaches his goal and there stands

 alone upon the height of attainmenta splendid ex-

 ample of a man concentrating his high qualities of

 mind and character upon one purpose.  The others

 travel in groups, pushed along by each other in the

 general forward movement on a beaten path to a com-

 fortable, little, made-to-order niche in that vast hall

 filled with those who content themselves with medio-

 crity, and there rest in placid self-satisfaction. Not of

 tlie latter but of the first mentioned is G. W. Waller,

 town builder and prosperity promoter, but above all a

 real man, never satisfied with his achievements but

 filled  with  that  insatiable  hunger  to  conquer  new

 worldsG. W. Waller, who wins victory wherever he

 strives.

   Mr. Waller typifies the "new spirit" of Florida, the

 spirit to will and to do, the spirit of enterprise.  A

 wholesale produce merchant of Philadelphia, he saw

 all sections of this broad land of plenty on his ex-

 tensive business trips and an accidental visit to the

 Hastings country, Florida; in 1907, opened his eyes to

 the immense possibilities of the soil here and convinced

 him that the greatest opportunities awaited one who

would grasp them. A picture of rich lands and fertile

acres to be developed never left his mind and as his

enthusiasm grew in retrospect it led him back to the

land of promise and he settled in Hastings in 1909,

becoming, in a few years, a man leading in its most

important industry, the potato culture, and now he

 stands at the head of or is connected with all of the

enterprises that make Hastings what it is todaya

thriving, fast-growing community, making aggressive

strides to become -an important center of the south-

land.  There is conceived no measure of importance

in connection with the town on which he is not con-

sulted, and his name is connected with practically all

of them and in most of them he is a moving force.

Promotion enterprises of a commercial nature and of

vital importance to the life and expansion of the town

are guided by his able. mind, and the Board of Trade,

that body of men who work foremost for growth, has

him for president, while as the head of the council lie

directs the governmental affairs of the city.  Immense

concerns owe their inception to his enterprise and their

development to his progressive spirit and indomitable

perseverance.

  G. W. Waller was born near Salisbury, Wicomico

county, Maryland, December 8, 1865, a son of E. M.

and Sallie A. (Bradley) Waller, natives of the same

county.  There the father successfully followed agri-

cultural pursuits until 1883, in which year he removed

to Laurel, Delaware, where he engaged in the mer-

cantile business, in which he gained success

 until called to his final rest in 1893, at the age

of sixty-seven years.

He was a man highly thought of in the communities

where he resided and always gave his support to those

measures which made for advancement and progress.

A democrat in his political affiliations, he was active in

the affairs of his party during all his life and held

such important public offices as that of county com-

missioner, sheriff and legislator, discharging his duties

in these various connections to the satisfaction of his

constituents and greatly to his own credit.  The Waller

family is among the early Maryland families coming

from the mother country to that state during colonial

days.  The mother, Mrs. Sallie A. (Bradley) Waller,

was born in 1832 and passed away at Wilmington,

Delaware, in 1911, at the age of about seventy-nine

years.  In their family were three daughters and five

sons:  Elizabeth, the wife of Alonzo W. Philips, of

Delmar, Delaware; Sallie W., who married William

R. Philips, who resides near Delmar, Delaware and is

a brother of Alonzo W. Philips; Manson, who was

engaged in the clothing business in Laurel, Delaware,

and there passed away at the age of forty-five years;

Josephine, who married J. F. Thomas, a merchant of

Wilmington; T. J., .a clothing merchant of Laurel; G.

W., of this review; Lionel S., formerly a telegraph

operator who passed away in New London, Connecti-

cut, at the age of thirty-four years; and Dr. L. 0.

Waller, of Philadelphia, who is a dentist by profession

and prominent in political circles of that city, having

served as select councilman from the ninth ward, of

which he is the leader, and having declined the honor

of nomination to congress on the Keystone ticket.

  G. W. Waller was reared under the parental roof

and grew to manhood on his father's farm, acquiring

his education in the schools of the neighborhood.  In

1883 he removed with his parents to Delaware, where

he assisted his father in the mercantile business, be-

coming acquainted with the details of procedure of

such an enterprise and with general commercial prin-

ciples.  Upon the death of the father in 1893, G. W.

Waller removed to Philadelphia to seek the wider

fields of the larger city and engaged in the wholesale

fruit and produce business.   He became eminently

successful along this line and in the course of business

traveled extensively not only over the United States

but also making trips to England, Ireland and Scot-

land, buying and soliciting for produce.  The trip to

the British isles was made for the purpose of import-

ing potatoes from there and he also acted as business

agent and handled the tomato output of Hazelhurst,

Mississippi, watermelons and canteloupes from Lumber

Bridge, North Carolina, and grapes from Hector, New

York.  Besides acting as broker and agent for these

large interests he also bought independently.  In 1907,

during one of his business trips, made for the purpose

 of buying potatoes, he came to Hastings, Florida, and

perceiving the pronounced progress which was made

here and appreciating the opportunities of the future,

bought a farm in the spring of 1909, when he decided

to definitely settle here, arriving at his destination in

the fall of the same year.  At this time he gave up all

of his interests in Philadelphia and henceforth devoted

his whole attention to his local enterprise.  That he

has not been mistaken in his judgment is evident by

the wonderful progress that has been made here and

by which he has benefited.  Not only, however, has

he been a witness of the changes that have occurred

but he has been the most active factor in bringing them

about.  He is firmly convinced of the great future in

store for Hastings and can conceive no greater oppor-

tunity for any man in any walk of life than to settle

here, which place he considers of the greatest promise

of all he has ever visited.  His only regret is that his

attention was not called sooner to the dormant riches

which awaited but development.  Mr. Waller owns

and operates-a tract of about one hundred acres near.

Hastings entirely devoted to potato culture and the

important position which he occupies among the men

engaged in this industry is evident in the office he

holds in connection with the Hastings-Elkton Potato

Exchange as secretary, treasurer and general manager,

his services being largely devoted to the marketing of

the local output and obtaining of the highest prices

possible.  Mr. Waller's abilities have carried him into a

number of other important relations and he serves at

present as the president of the Hastings Water Com-

pany, treasurer of the Hastings Development Com-

pany and is also chairman of the board of directors of

the East Hastings Terminal Company, of which he

is one of the five owners.   As president of the Board

of Trade he has been foremost among the men who

have made possible the rapid development of the town

and have brought about the commercial expansion

which the city now enjoys.  Another line along which.

lie lias been prominent is that of the good roads move-

ment and he is acting at this writing as chairman of

the good roads committee of Hastings, doing work

that highly redounds to his credit.  Public-spirited in

the truest sense of the word, he has never held back in

offering his services, wherever they would be of benefit,

and as the president of the Hastings city council has

instituted a number of measures and has seen them

enacted, that have brought about improvements of

great benefit.

  Mr. Waller was united in marriage to Miss Fannie

E. Benney, a native of Talbot county, Maryland, and

a daughter of Dr. Frank Benney.  Mr. and Mrs. Wal-

ler have two children:   Marie, the wife of John B.

Westenhaver, of Hastings,and the mother of one daughter,  Frances; and William  Manson, who is

eighteen years of age and resides with his parents.

  Mr. Waller has always led a busy life in which in-

dolence and idleness have had no part and while he is

attaining his own success he is largely instrumental in

the development of Hastings, glad to do his share of

the work of making this section what he believes it

will one day become, one of the most prosperous in

the world.  He is always in the front ranks with those

who lead the way and by his activities has demonstrated

the success which it is possible to attain here.  In all

that he undertakes he is actuated by a spirit of con-

tagious enthusiasm that is an inspiration to others,

and acting according to the dictates of his faith and

judgment the wisdom of his opinion has been proven.

His activities have been a serviceable factor in the

growth and upbuilding of Hastings and there is no

more loyal advocate of the town which he calls his

home.

 The following info has been added by  Ben MacDonald of Glendale, AZ

My GGF was Thaddeus A.R. Phillips, the brother of Alonzo and TheodorePhillips you mention on your webpage. I am a descendent of Eliza Waller (my GGGM) who was married to William A.R.Phillips. Their son James W.T. Phillips was brother to Theodore & Alonzo in Delmar. Eliza Waller Phillips is buried on the Phillips farm in Delmar, DE where Sallie Waller Phillips is buried (not in Laurel)

My geneaolgy information, if true, shows my GGGgrandmother, Eliza Waller, as the daughter of Jonathan Waller II and Rachel WilsonThe mother, Mrs. Sallie A. (Bradley) Waller,was born in 1832 and passed away at Wilmington,Delaware, in 1911, at the age of about seventy-nineyears. In their family were three daughters and fivesons: Elizabeth, the wife of Alonzo W. Philips, of Delmar, Delaware; Sallie W., who married William R. Philips, who resides near Delmar, Delaware and is a brother of Alonzo W. Philips; Manson, who was engaged in the clothing business in Laurel, Delaware, and there passed away at the age of forty-five years; Josephine, who married J. F. Thomas, a merchant of Wilmington; T. J., .a clothing merchant of Laurel; G. W., of this review; Lionel S., formerly a telegraph operator who passed away in New London, Connecticut, at the age of thirty-four years; and Dr. L. 0. Waller, of Philadelphia, who is a dentist by profession and prominent in political circles of that city, having served as select councilman from the ninth ward, of which he is the leader, and having declined the honor of nomination to congress on the Keystone ticket. G. W. Waller was reared under the parental roof and grew to manhood on his father's farm, acquiring his education in the schools of the neighborhood. In 1883 he removed with his parents to Delaware, where he assisted his father in the mercantile business, be- coming acquainted with the details of procedure of such an enterprise and with general commercial principles. Upon the death of the father in 1893, G. W. Waller removed to Philadelphia to seek the wider fields of the larger city and engaged in the wholesale fruit and produce business.

The Phillips Family Cemetery in Delmar, Delaware
phillipsfamilycemeterydelmarde1.jpg
Click on picture for more info

Elizabeth Waller Grave in Delmar, Delaware
elizawallerphillipsgrave.jpg

The Phillips House in Delmar, Delaware
phillipshousedelmarde.jpg

The House of Theodore Phillips
housetheodorephillips2.jpg

The House of Alonzo Phillips
housealonzophillipsdelmar2.jpg

The Waller House in Delmar, Delaware
wallerhousedelmarde.jpg

georgeandfannywallerhome.jpg

waller.jpg

wallerresidencewmgeorgemarie.jpg

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